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Prostate Cancer Screening

 

Cancer screening means looking for cancer before it causes symptoms. The goal of screening for prostate cancer is to find cancers that may be at high risk for spreading if not treated, and to find them early before they spread.

 

If you are thinking about being screened, learn about the possible benefits and harms of screening, diagnosis, and treatment, and talk to your doctor about your personal risk factors.

 

There is no standard test to screen for prostate cancer. Two tests that are commonly used to screen for prostate cancer are described below.

 

Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) Test

 

A blood test called a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test measures the level of PSA in the blood. PSA is a substance made by the prostate. The levels of PSA in the blood can be higher in men who have prostate cancer. The PSA level may also be elevated in other conditions that affect the prostate.

 

As a rule, the higher the PSA level in the blood, the more likely a prostate problem is present. But many factors, such as age and race, can affect PSA levels. Some prostate glands make more PSA than others.

 

PSA levels also can be affected by

 

  • Certain medical procedures.
  • Certain medications.
  • An enlarged prostate.
  • A prostate infection.

 

Because many factors can affect PSA levels, your doctor is the best person to interpret your PSA test results. If the PSA test is abnormal, your doctor may recommend a biopsy to find out if you have prostate cancer.

 

Digital Rectal Examination (DRE)

 

Digital rectal examination (DRE) is when a health care provider inserts a gloved, lubricated finger into a man’s rectum to feel the prostate for anything abnormal, such as cancer. In 2018, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force stated that it does not recommend DRE as a screening test because of lack evidence on the benefits.