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Enasidenib Mesylate

Enasidenib Mesylate

Enasidenib Mesylate is a targeted therapy. This medicine is classified as an “isocitrate dehydrogenase 2 (IDH2) inhibitor.”

Enasidenib is used to treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in adults with an IDH2 mutation. Enasidenib is used when AML has come back or has not improved with prior treatment.

HOW ENASIDENIB IS GIVEN

  • This drug is administered orally once daily with or without food at approximately the same time each day.
  • Swallow tablets whole with a full glass of water. Do not split or crush the tablets.
  • If a dose is missed, vomited, or delayed, administer the dose as soon as you remember on the same day. If you do not think about the missed dose until the next day, skip the missed dose and continue with the next scheduled dose. Do not take two doses on the same day.

SIDE EFFECTS

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Enasidenib can cause a condition called differentiation syndrome, which affects blood cells and can be fatal if not treated. This condition may occur within 10 days to 5 months after you start taking enasidenib.

Seek medical help right away if you have symptoms of differentiation syndrome:

  • fever, cough, trouble breathing;
  • bone pain;
  • rapid weight gain; or
  • swelling in your arms, legs, underarms, groin, or neck.

Call your doctor at once if you have any of these side effects:

  • dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • severe or ongoing vomiting or diarrhea; or
  • signs of tumor cell breakdown–tiredness, weakness, muscle cramps, nausea, fast or slow heart rate, vomiting, diarrhea, tingling in your hands and feet or around your mouth.

Common side effects may include:

  • nausea, vomiting, diarrhea;
  • loss of appetite; or
  • jaundice.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

DOSAGE

Usual Adult Dose for Acute Myeloid Leukemia:-

100 mg orally once a day with or without food

Duration of Therapy:-

  • Treat until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.
  • For patients without disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, treat for a minimum of 6 months to allow time for clinical response.

Comments:- 

Select patients based on the presence of isocitrate dehydrogenase-2 (IDH2) mutations in the blood or bone marrow as detected by an FDA-approved test.

Use:- 

Treatment of relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with an IDH2 mutation.

PRECAUTIONS

  • Before starting enasidenib treatment, make sure you tell your doctor about any other medications you are taking (including prescription, over-the-counter, vitamins, or herbal remedies, etc.).
  • Do not receive any kind of immunization or vaccination without your doctor’s approval while taking enasidenib.
  • Inform your health care professional if you are pregnant or may be pregnant prior to starting this treatment. The use of enasidenib in pregnancy may cause fetal harm.
  • For both men and women: Use contraceptives, and do not conceive a child (get pregnant) while taking enasidenib.
  • Do not breastfeed while taking enasidenib.

SELF-CARE TIPS

  • Drink at least two to three quarts of fluid every 24 hours, unless you are instructed otherwise.
  • You may be at risk of infection so try to avoid crowds or people with colds, and report fever or any other signs of infection immediately to your health care provider.
  • Wash your hands often.
  • To help treat/prevent mouth sores, use a soft toothbrush, and rinse three times a day with 1 teaspoon of baking soda mixed with 8 ounces of water.
  • Use an electric razor and a soft toothbrush to minimize bleeding.
  • Avoid contact sports or activities that could cause injury.
  • To reduce nausea, take anti-nausea medications as prescribed by your doctor, and eat small, frequent meals.
  • Follow a regimen of anti-diarrhea medication as prescribed by your health care professional.
  • Eat foods that may help reduce diarrhea.
  • Avoid sun exposure. Wear SPF 30 (or higher) sunblock and protective clothing.
  • In general, drinking alcoholic beverages should be kept to a minimum or avoided completely. You should discuss this with your doctor.
  • Get plenty of rest.
  • Maintain good nutrition.
  • Remain active as you are able. Gentle exercise is encouraged such as a daily walk.
  • If you experience symptoms or side effects, be sure to discuss them with your health care team. They can prescribe medications and/or offer other suggestions that are effective in managing such problems.
  • Avoid people with any type of infection or who recently have been vaccinated.

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