Introduction of Desmoplastic Infantile Ganglioglioma Childhood Tumour

Executive Summary

Desmoplastic infantile ganglioglioma is a rare type of brain tumors in children. It begins in the supportive cells of the brain called glial cells and is primarily seen in infants younger than 18 to 24 months. Desmoplastic Infantile Ganglioglioma (DIG), Childhood Tumors, is generally classified as a slow-growing, low-grade tumor, usually non-cancerous, and a high-grade tumor in case the tumor proliferates and shows metastasis to other body parts. Early signs and symptoms of these Childhood Tumors may not be visible or experienced. Some of the visible signs and symptoms of (DIG), Childhood Tumors include rapid head growth, a bulging fontanelle, vomiting, sunset sign etc. Surgical resection is considered the standard treatment procedure for Desmoplastic Infantile Ganglioglioma or DIG, Childhood Tumors. A biopsy, imaging tests like MRI, CT scans could be used to diagnose (DIG), childhood tumors. The disease shows an excellent prognosis, and most cases can be cured completely.

Desmoplastic Infantile Ganglioglioma Childhood Tumour

What is Desmoplastic Infantile Childhood Tumor?

Desmoplastic infantile ganglioglioma, or DIG, are rare brain tumors that arise in children ​1​. A tumor growth starts when normal, healthy cells undergo mutation and starts to increase without control, resulting in the formation of a mass. A tumor can be benign or malignant. Benign tumors are tumors that grow but don’t spread or metastasise to other body areas. Malignant tumors are aggressive tumors that can invade other tissues or organs ​2​.

Desmoplastic Infantile Ganglioglioma, Childhood Tumor is a kind of glioma that begins in the supportive cells of the brain called glial cells. DIG tumors can be enormous and commonly occur on one side of the brain. DIG tumors are primarily seen in infants younger than 18 to 24 months. In most cases, this childhood tumors, starts even before a child is born. These tumors mainly occur in the frontal or parietal lobes of the brain.

Desmoplastic Infantile Ganglioglioma (DIG), Childhood Tumors, is generally classified as a slow-growing, low-grade tumor usually non-cancerous. But in some cases, the tumor can grow rapidly and can metastasise or invade other parts of the brain or body. In such a case, the tumor can be termed a high-grade tumor.

Early signs and symptoms of this Childhood Tumors may not be visible or experienced. Also, most infants with DIG do not share any seizures. However, some of the visible signs and symptoms of Desmoplastic Infantile Ganglioglioma, Childhood Tumors include rapid head growth, a bulging fontanelle, vomiting, sunset sign etc.

Surgical resection is considered the standard treatment procedure for Desmoplastic Infantile Ganglioglioma or DIG, Childhood Tumors ​3​. In this, the surgeon attempts to eliminate the tumor fully or partially. The size of the tumor resected depends on the tumor size and its location. If surgical resection is not possible, chemotherapy would be recommended, but only if required.

A biopsy, imaging tests like MRI, CT scans could be used to diagnose Desmoplastic Infantile Ganglioglioma, childhood tumors. The disease shows an excellent prognosis, and most cases can be cured completely. Even the follow-up of most DIG patients shows no trace of the tumor ​4​. But spontaneous regression of the tumor growth has been recorded in some cases.

References

  1. 1.
    Tanık C. A Rare Tumour in Childhood Desmoplastic Infantile Astrocytoma 2 Case Reports in the Context of the Literature. Sisli Etfal. Published online 2018. doi:10.14744/semb.2018.29292
  2. 2.
    De Munnynck K, Van Gool S, Van Calenbergh F, et al. Desmoplastic Infantile Ganglioglioma. The American Journal of Surgical Pathology. Published online November 2002:1515-1522. doi:10.1097/00000478-200211000-00015
  3. 3.
    Duffner PK, Burger PC, Cohen ME, et al. Desmoplastic Infantile Gangliogliomas. Neurosurgery. Published online April 1994:583-589. doi:10.1227/00006123-199404000-00003
  4. 4.
    Mallucci C, Lellouch-Tubiana A, Salazar C, et al. The management of desmoplastic neuroepithelial tumours in childhood. Child’s Nerv Syst. Published online January 10, 2000:8-14. doi:10.1007/pl00007280