Calcium Glucarate

D-glucaric acid is a chemical generated naturally in tiny amounts by animals, including humans. Calcium-D-glucarate is the calcium salt of D-glucaric acid. Many fruits and vegetables contain glucaric acid, with oranges, apples, grapefruit, and cruciferous vegetables having the greatest amounts. Beta-glucuronidase, an enzyme generated by intestinal microflora and involved in Phase II liver detoxification, has been found to be inhibited by calcium-D-glucarate intake.

Increased beta-glucuronidase activity has been linked to an increased risk of cancer, especially hormone-dependent malignancies including breast, prostate, and colon cancers. Other clinical applications of or that have been proposed

D-glucarate calcium is a chemical. It’s comparable to glucaric acid, a naturally occurring molecule. Glucaric acid is present in fruits and vegetables such as oranges, apples, brussels sprouts, broccoli, and cabbage, as well as in human bodies. Calcium D-glucarate is a supplement created by mixing glucaric acid with calcium to create a medication.

Calcium D-glucarate is used to prevent breast, prostate, and colon cancer, as well as to rid the body of cancer-causing chemicals, toxins, and steroid hormones.

The Role of Calcium D-Glucarate in Hormone Balance - HormonesBalance.com

Glucaric acid is found naturally in a number of foods, including apples, oranges, broccoli, and spinach. Calcium glucarate is the salt and commercial version of glucaric acid. Cancer has been treated and prevented using calcium glucarate and its compounds. Following surgery or complementary therapies, patients with breast cancer may self-medicate with calcium glucarate supplements. Its action is considered to be due to the glucarate component, not the calcium. Glucarate is transformed to D-glucaro-1,4-lactone after ingestion, which inhibits beta-glucuronidase.

In vitro and animal research show that inhibiting beta-glucuronidase can prevent carcinogenesis, as well as cancer cell start and progression. There has also been evidence of increased removal of toxins and hormones, including oestrogen. Calcium glucarate treatment had chemopreventive benefits in colon and lung cancer animals during the post-initiation phase of carcinogenesis. Oral carcinogenesis was also reduced by dietary calcium glucarate. Topical calcium glucarate inhibited tumour growth in mouse skin tumours, while a combination of topical butyric acid, nicotinamide, and calcium glucarate improved chemopreventive effects.

Low glucaric acid levels and/or high beta-glucuronidase levels are indicators of detoxification system impairment, according to preliminary data from a human research, and calcium glucarate supplementation may lower cancer risk in some people. There have been no follow-up investigations, and more research is needed to validate these findings.

Calcium dietary sources Cruciferous vegetables including broccoli, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts, as well as oranges, grapefruit, apples, spinach, carrots, potatoes, lettuce, bean sprouts, and grapes, are high in glucarate.

Action mechanism

The action of calcium glucarate, which is absorbed from the gut as D-glucaric acid, is attributed to the glucarate component rather than the calcium. D-glucaro-1,4-lactone is then formed, which is considered to limit beta-glucuronidase action. By deconjugation, beta-glucuronidase has been demonstrated to slow the clearance of oestrogen and carcinogens such polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrosamines. Calcium glucarate inhibits beta-glucuronidase activity, which increases excretion of processed oestrogen and carcinogens. D-glucarate can also be digested by gut bacteria, which inhibits bacterial beta-glucuronidase and may disrupt the enterohepatic cycle.

Calcium glucarate, through DNA adduct elimination, mutagenic suppression, and anti-inflammatory action, decreased the number of benzo[a]pyrene-induced lung lesions with altered K-ras and p53 genes in the post-initiation phase in animal experiments. Topical calcium glucarate’s antitumorigenic effects may be attributed to promoted differentiation and reduction of proliferation via stimulation of transglutaminase activity (6), as well as inhibition of thymidine kinase and aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activities, inhibiting carcinogen-DNA binding.

Induced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, upregulated p21, and downregulated Bcl-2, mut p53, resulted in enhanced chemopreventive effects by a topical butyric acid, nicotinamide, and calcium glucarate combination used on murine skin tumours. In another research, this combination controlled miR-203 status through epigenetic or biogenetic modulations to a higher extent than each of the separate drugs before and after tumour growth. COX-2 and IL-6 expression were significantly reduced when epidermal hyperplasia was reduced with a combination of topical ursolic acid and dietary calcium glucarate intake.

Calcium glucarate supplementation reduced beta-glucuronidase levels while raising serum glucaric acid levels in a preliminary human investigation.

D-glucaric acid is a chemical generated naturally in tiny amounts by animals, including humans. Calcium-D-glucarate is the calcium salt of D-glucaric acid. Many fruits and vegetables contain glucaric acid, with oranges, apples, grapefruit, and cruciferous vegetables having the greatest amounts. Beta-glucuronidase, an enzyme generated by intestinal microflora and involved in Phase II liver detoxification, has been found to be inhibited by calcium-D-glucarate intake. Increased beta-glucuronidase activity has been linked to an increased risk of cancer, especially hormone-dependent malignancies including breast, prostate, and colon cancers.

Although laboratory studies suggest that calcium glucarate has anticancer properties, it has not been shown to cure or prevent cancer in humans. In the gut, calcium glucarate is absorbed and transformed into a molecule that inhibits beta-glucuronidase, potentially increasing hazardous material removal. For example, rats given calcium glucarate and exposed to carcinogens exhibited a slower beginning of tumour growth and a lower number of tumours than rats not fed calcium glucarate. Calcium glucarate also promotes oestrogen excretion, potentially lowering oestrogen levels in the body. This explains why it’s used as supportive treatment for people with estrogen-sensitive breast cancer.

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