Manisha Yadav (Breast Cancer): “Be your own support!”

Recurring Lumps:

I used to go for regular checkups every year but completely missed it in 2014 and 2015 because of some personal reasons. I was diagnosed with breast cancer in December 2016, and I am a breast cancer survivor. Initially, when I felt the lumps, I did not pay much heed to it. Moreover, I associated it with the recurring nature of these lumps with menopause as I was around 48 years old at that time.

 

The doctor who studied my blood reports said that everything was normal, but I was not convinced. Finally, he told me that if I have any such doubts in my mind, then it is always better to go for thorough checkups and testing. That is when I learned that I had stage II cancer and it had already reached my lymph nodes.

Appalling Indifference:

Here, I would like to discuss an incident that happened at the first doctor’s place. She was scheduled to leave for a vacation and said that she would do the surgery after her return in January. When I insisted that there cannot be such a delay after getting the biopsy result, she suggested that she would do the surgery first and then leave for her trip.

 

But I was concerned about what I would do alone if there were a medical emergency in her absence. She had no answer to this, and that is when I decided to move to another specialist. I was appalled by the indifferent behavior. Then, a brother-like family friend suggested to me about another doctor, and that proved to be a turning point in my treatment.

A Phase that Passed:

I underwent 16 chemotherapy sessions and the best part about my breast cancer treatment was that it was done at a reasonable price, so I did not splurge on it. I remember that my sessions went on till June that year. My life is back to “normal” now, it is the regular life that I followed before my diagnosis, and I have learned a lot about the changes that are important for everyone. Working in the IT industry for several years, I am back at work, and it all seems fine. Indeed, it was a phase that has gone by, educating us about so much.

The Pillars of Strength:

I feel that your friends and family play a vital role in keeping you positive. In my case, it was an enormous pillar of strength. When I found out that I was suffering from stage II cancer, I was shattered and questioned destiny that why was I the one going through so much trouble and pain. But then I decided to focus on my healing.

 

Cancer should be treated like any other typical disease and nothing more. Key factors that had affected me were work pressure, sleeping pattern, stress, emotional imbalance, and likewise. Thus, lifestyle changes can make all the difference for you.

Integrating Homeopathy:

While I was undergoing chemo, I decided to integrate homeopathy into my healing process. Though homeopathy shows gradual results, it was a boon to me because it helped me tackle the side-effects of chemotherapy brilliantly. But there are specific changes in my diet that I follow till date and have genuinely felt healthier. I have entirely stopped consuming dairy, refined sugar, and wheat. It is important to eat balanced meals and do some exercise every day.

Extortion:

One of the biggest eye-openers for me was the extortion that exists in this field. Most people fear death, and cancer is marketed as a fatal disease. It is the main reason why people are often ready to pay any amount that the doctors ask for.

 

I came face-to-face with a harsh reality. While my first doctor straight away asked me to start chemo, the other doctor told me to wait for my confirmed reports and then devise a proper plan of treatment. Moreover, my initial doctor went to the extent of telling me that she can provide me cheaper therapy at another clinic and explained the tariffs. It seemed nothing more than a business deal!

The Importance of a Second Opinion:

My father-in-law lost his life battling cancer. He was diagnosed at a terminal stage, and two out of three doctors told us that he should not undergo any treatment because it will not yield any results. So, a second opinion is always better.

 

When I was diagnosed, the first thing I confirmed with the doctor was my life-span. I did not wish to experience so much pain if my life would be prolonged only by a year or so. A practical and positive approach can go a long way! It is about meeting the right people in your journey.

Sabbatical:

I had very supportive work colleagues and associates who encouraged me to take a 6 months’ break from work and return with renewed energy and zeal to strive for excellence. Another pressure that I had was an ailing mother-in-law at home, and the stress affected me adversely.

Community Support:

I met a lady who lost her cancer battle after 8 years and felt that a better and quicker treatment could have helped her survive. But I do not think there is a certain way in which anyone can be so sure about the lack of effective therapy. It is essential to trust the doctors and remain positive. While some people emerge victoriously, some succumb, and there is nothing that any external force can do.

 

I had very supportive work colleagues and associates who encouraged me to take a 6 months’ break from work and return with renewed energy and zeal to strive for excellence. Another pressure that I had was an ailing bedridden mother-in-law at home, and the stress affected me adversely.

My Better-Half:

My husband was a constant motivation and support for me. He never let me feel that he was stuck with a sick wife and had too much on his shoulders. I want every cancer fighter to look after themselves instead of relying on anyone else emotionally. You are your biggest hero!